Luu Hon Vu, Le Quoc Tuan, Tran Thi Ngoc Anh, Nguyen Thi Phuong Truc

Main Article Content

Abstract

The purpose of this research paper is to look into the current situation of using learning strategies and the key factors that influence English learning strategies of tertiary students who major in economics at Banking University of Ho Chi Minh City. On the basis of Oxford’s (1990) theory on language learning strategies, the study conducted a questionnaire survey with the participation of 300 students. The results show that economics-majored students use English learning strategies at a relatively high frequency, with the metacognitive strategies group having the highest frequency; the groups of affective strategies and compensation strategies have the lowest frequency of use. It also draws a conlusion that individual factors such as gender, grade level, and major do not appear to have a significant impact on students' use of English learning strategies. There are no significant differences between male and female students, between students of all grades, and between students of different majors in the frequency of using English learning strategies.

Keywords: Learning strategies, English, students of economics.

References

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